Classique Aviation

Classique Aviation was founded in 2001 by a group of aviation enthusiasts who dreamed of making the thrill of flying available to as many people as possible. Initially we only offered Tiger Moth flips, but due to an ever increasing demand we extended our fleet to a wide range of aircraft. Now our services include flight training, charter, aviation recreation and retail. Classique Aviation simply offers you safe and inspiring travel.

Grade

Epic

Disabled Friendly

Yes

Accommodation

No

Team Building Facilities

Yes

Family Friendly

Yes

  • Category
  • Location
  • Grade
  • Disabled Friendly
    Yes
  • Accommodation
    No
  • Team Building Facilities
    Yes
  • Family Friendly
    Yes

Chartered Flights

Our Aircraft

•        Robinson R44

Charter Packages

•        Helicopter Picnic or Lunch

•        Magaliesberg Canopy Tour

•        Saddle Creek Ranch

•        Aerial Photography & Surveys

Scenic & Aerobatic Flights

Our Aeroplanes

•        DH82A Tiger Moth Scenic Flight

•        Pitts Special S2B Aerobatic Flight

Our Helicopters

•        Bell 222/230 (Airwolf)

•        Robinson R44 Flights

Scenic Day Flight

Thrilling, Adventurous Helicopter Experience

Climb aboard the Robinson R44 helicopter, for the thrill of your Life!  Experience the thrill of hovering and an unforgettable flight over Johannesburg CBD or a romantic scenic flight over Klipriver, south of Johannesburg.  Nothing else comes close to the magic of vertical flight! The unique feeling of lifting vertically is an experience of a lifetime which you may never forget!  Take your seat as the pilot climbs gracefully and accelerates to about 200km/h.  Then swooping over landscapes, and a while later settling gently back to earth.  See the city from a new perspective, a memory of a special day which will last a lifetime!

Helicopter Flight with Magaliesberg Canopy Tour

Enjoy the unbelievable experience of a helicopter flight to the Sparkling Waters Hotel and Spa in the Magaliesberg mountains where you will have an opportunity to participate in a Magaliesberg Canopy Tour through the Ysterhout Kloof.

Helicopter Flight with Horse Safari and Romantic Picnic

Romantic, Thrilling, Adventurous Helicopter Experience!

Enjoy the unbelievable experience of a helicopter flight, to the beautiful Hekpoort Valley at Hartebeespoort Dam with a Horse safari through the Valley, creamed with a romantic picnic on the banks of the Magalies River. Ideal for romantic proposals, anniversaries, or just spoil the loved one in your life for a day that he/she will never forget!

Aerial Photography & Surveys

We also provide services for customers that require aerial photography and surveys. Tiger Moth Background

Captain de Havilland had other interests than aviation, and one of them was insects, notably butterflies and moths. Moths, or most of them, fold their wings back along their bodies when at rest, and de Havilland arranged for his pH. 60 to do the same, so you could tow it on the road behind a car, and keep it in an ordinary garage. All the DH 60 then lacked was the dignity of a name. But surely there was one ready-made! The Moth.

The Captain made the Moth’s first flight on February 22, 1925, and even he seems to have been surprised at how nicely it flew. As was a remarkable gentleman, Sir Sefton Brancker, not long after. Sir Sefton was director of Civil Aviation, and he took the powerful step of starting five government-sponsored flying clubs and ordering a grand total of ninety Moths to equip them. It was the beginning of private flying on any appreciable scale in Britain or, indeed, the world. (The Taylor/Piper Cub was still ten years in the future.)

The prototype Moth had (I think) a blue-painted fuselage and clear-doped, gauzy, dragonfly-like wings, and so did the first few turned out thereafter, but soon silver was adopted as the standard finish, Moth-silver being a kind of British parallel to Cub-yellow. The eThaust pipe, which ran along the left side of the cockpit and burned your left wrist if you weren’t careful, was moved to the right side-I know not why-where it burned your right wrist. A little of the vertical fin was taken away and given to the rudder to lighten the load on your feet, and the luggage locker was moved to behind the rear cockpit, and that was all. The Moth was now perfect.

Its performance might seem modest enough by today’s standards, but for a private airplane in the 1920’s it was progress. The Cirrus Moth cruised at about 80 mph, with a rate of climb of maybe 500 feet per minute, and a fuel consumption of four and a half gallons per hour. All this was a giant step forward from the pitiful flutterings of the ultralight airplanes of the Lympne trials. The Moth in flight was very quiet and not uncomfortable, and the purchase price of £830, while far from being within the reach of all, was certainly within the reach of many. You could operate a Moth for under a pound an hour, and this modest expenditure, further reduced by the Government’s generous and enlightened subsidies to the flying clubs, made flying intensely popular in no time at all. The Moth was an extremely practical airplane and, more important, it was quite reliable.

Its development continued steadily. Soon there was the Cirrus II Moth with the engine lowered an inch or two to improve the pilot’s rotten forward view; and the Genet Moth, with a rather uncertain 75-hp radial engine of that name; and the Hermes Moth, with a new kind of Cirrus uprated to a tremendous, breathtaking 105 horsepower.

But soon there came a problem. Owing to the Moth’s very success, the supply of war surplus Airdisco engines and, therefore, of the Cirruses that were made from them began to dwindle. Further, the company making the conversions found the work not notably profitable and began to lose interest. The Cirrus was a cornerstone of the Moth’s success; what was Captain de Havilland to do? Nothing for it but to make his own engine, with Halford’s help.

Although General Motors might disagree, one of the quickest ways to develop an engine, both mechanically and in the public’s eye, is through racing, and this was the101route de Havilland chose to follow. After his racing engine had established itself, while putting out some 135 hp, he planned to manufacture it in a form derated to nearer 100 hp. A racing airplane would be needed. Quickly de Havilland came up with D.H. 71, named Tiger Moth, but no relation to our later heroine of the same name. Two D.H. 71’s were built in the traditional great secrecy. They were low-wing monoplanes of the sleekest lines designed to have the smallest possible cross section that could enclose de Havilland’s test pilot Hubert Broad, who fortunately was fairly narrow.

Halford’s new engine was a pippin. For its 135-hp output it weighed, at three hundred pounds, only fourteen pounds more than the old Cirrus. The handling of the D.H. 71 kept Hubert Broad busy, and it was not a notable racing success, although one did capture a world speed record in its weight class at 186.47 mph. And it did prove out the new engine. De Havilland chose for the new powerplant the name Gipsy, and the airplane thus powered became the Gipsy Moth.

With the 100-mph Gipsy Moth, the high tide of success for de Havilland began to be a flood. His company, which in 1924 employed but a few hundred people and was capitalized at under £49,000, grew by 1930 to a business worth almost half a million pounds and employing fifteen hundred people. Production rose from less than one airplane a week to better than three a day. The Moth was making de Havilland rich, and he was able to reduce the machine’s price progressively. By 1929 it was down to a mere £650. Eighty-five out of a hundred private airplanes in Great Britain were Moths of one persuasion or another. When His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales (now the Duke of Windsor) purchased one, a Moth became absolutely the thing to have, and the society glossies were full of pictures of Sporting Characters and Bright Young Lady Pilots setting off for weekends in the country in their 103 Moths. Any kind of private airplane in England became, in general parlance, “a Moth,” in the same way that, later in the decade, any small airplane in America was “a Cub.”

Pitts Special S2B Aerobatic Flight
General Information & History

The designer of the original Pitts Special aerobatic biplane, Curtiss Pitts, could hardly have appreciated that his design would continue in production for over five decades, and that it would come to be considered by the general public as the definitive aerobatic and display flying aircraft.

The original prototype of the S1 Special first flew in September 1944.  The aircraft was of steel tube construction with fabric covering over wooden spars, while the two wings were braced with wire.  Power in early aircraft was supplied by 65 to 95kW (90 to 125hp) four cylinder Continentals or Lycomings.  Later models were higher powered and of conventional metal construction.

Factory production of the basic single seat S1 Special included the S1S with a 135kW (180kW) Lycoming IO360, driving a fixed pitch prop, and the current S1T.  The S1T was introduced to production in 1981, and introduced a 150kW (200hp) Lycoming (now Textron Lycoming) AEIO360 driving a constant speed prop and with symmetrical wings.  Homebuilt versions of the S1 include the S1D and S1E (for which plans or kits have been offered), while the S1S and S1T are also available in kit form.

The two seat S2 Special is of the same configuration as the single seat S1 but is larger overall, and generally regarded as a more capable aerobatic aircraft due to its larger size and heavier weight, more power and aerodynamic changes.  For this reason the S2 is also built in single seat 195kW (260hp) AEIO540 powered S2S form, while two seat models are the 150kW (200hp) IO360 powered S2A, and current production 195kW (260hp) powered and fully aerobatic with two occupants S2B.  The S2C has aerodynamic changes.

Bell 222/230 (Airwolf)
Origins

In the late 1960s, Bell began designing a new twin turbine engine light helicopter. A mock-up of the new helicopter was displayed in January 1974 at a helicopter convention. Following interest at the convention the company announced the new Bell 222. It was the first light commercial twin turbine engine helicopter developed in the United States.

The Bell 222 incorporated a number of advanced features including dual hydraulic and electrical systems, sponsons housing the retractable landing gear, and the Noda Matic vibration reduction system developed for the Bell 214ST.

Manufacturing began in 1975. The Model 222 first flew on August 13, 1976. It received certification from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on August 16, 1979 and was approved for visual flight rules (VFR) use on December 20, 1979. Helicopter deliveries began on January 16, 1980. The FAA approved the 222 for single pilot instrument flight rules (IFR) operation on May 15, 1980.

Improved versions

The more powerful Bell 222B was introduced in 1982 with a larger diameter main rotor. The 222B-based Bell 222UT Utility Twin, with skid landing gear, was introduced in 1983.

A development of the 222 is the Bell 230, with the 222’s LTS 101 engines replaced by two Allison 250 turboshafts, plus other refinements. A converted 222 first flew as the prototype 230 on August 12, 1991. Transport Canada awarded certification in March 1992, and the first production 230 was delivered that November. The 230 had optional skid or wheel undercarriage. Production ended in 1995 with 38 having been built, being replaced in Bell’s lineup by the stretched, more powerful Bell 430.

Design

The design includes two main rotor blades of stainless-steel-fiberglass construction and rotor hub with elastomeric bearings, which are lubricant free. Its cabin holds a maximum of 10 persons with 1-2 pilots and 8-9 passengers. Seating configurations include standard seating for a pilot and seven passengers; or executive seating with 1-2 pilots and seating for 5-6. The Bell 222 and 230 are usually flown single-pilot (optional dual controls are available), and can be configured for corporate/executive, EMS or utility transport missions.

The Bell 222 is powered by twin Lycoming/Honeywell LTS101-650 turboshaft engines, rated at 592 shp each. Later 222 versions feature more powerful engines. Engine output is at 100% of rating at 9598 RPM. Two independent drive shafts deliver power from the engines to the transmission. The Bell 222’s LST-engine exhaust stacks are located at the rear of the engines, while the 230’s Allison-engine exhaust stacks are located high on the cowling. Fuel is stored in three tanks, one in the fuselage and one in each sponson. The main rear landing gear retracts into the sponsons.

The Bell 222’s rotor systems include:

•        Two-blade, semi-rigid high-kinetic energy main rotor with preconing and underslinging. The rotor head incorporates elastomeric bearings for hub springs, flapping and pitch change bearings. The system is similar in design to that used by the AH-1 Cobra. Rotor speed at 100% engine speed is 348 RPM.

•        All series models incorporate a pusher-type two-bladed tail rotor mounted on the left side of the tailboom, turning at 3396 RPM.

Robinson R44 Scenic & Sunset Flights
General Information & History

The Robinson R44 is a four-seat light helicopter produced by the Robinson Helicopter Company since 1992. Based on the company’s two-place Robinson R22, the R44 features hydraulically-assisted flight controls. The R44 was first flown on 31 March 1990, and received FAA certification in December 1992, with the first delivery in February 1993.

The R44 is a single-engined helicopter with a semi-rigid two-bladed main rotor and a two-bladed tail rotor and a skid landing gear. It has an enclosed cabin with two rows of side-by-side seating for a pilot and three passengers. Tail rotor direction of rotation on the R44 is reversed compared to the R22 for improved yaw control authority. On the R44 the advancing blade is on the bottom.

Designed during the 1980s by Frank Robinson and his staff of engineers, the R44 first flew on March 31, 1990. The R44 Astro was awarded an FAA Type Certificate in December 1992, with the first deliveries taking place in January 1993. In January 2000, Robinson introduced the Raven with hydraulically-assisted controls and adjustable pedals. In July 2002, Robinson introduced the Raven II featuring a more powerful, fuel-injected engine and wider blades, allowing a higher gross weight and improved altitude performance.

In 1997, a Robinson R44 was piloted by Jennifer Murray for the first helicopter circumnavigation of the world by a woman, covering a distance of 36,000 miles in 97 days. Chilean president Sebastián Piñera owns one of these choppers, and has made several public appearances flying it. Since 2002, Belgian Prince Philippe has flown a red R44 for personal leisure, with the unique registry code “OO-PFB”, which stands for “Prins Filip België”.[1] British singer Jay Kay also owns an R44 (registry code G-JKAY), which he pilots in the music video to the song White Knuckle Ride.

Scenic Day Flight

Thrilling, Adventurous Helicopter Experience

Climb aboard the Robinson R44 helicopter, for the thrill of your Life!  Experience the thrill of hovering and an unforgettable flight over Johannesburg CBD or a romantic scenic flight over Klipriver, south of Johannesburg.  Nothing else comes close to the magic of vertical flight! The unique feeling of lifting vertically, is an experience of a lifetime which you may never forget!  Take your seat as the pilot climbs gracefully and accelerates to about 200km/h.  Then swooping over landscapes, and a while later settling gently back to earth.  See the city from a new perspective, a memory of a special day which will last a lifetime!

Romantic Sunset Flight Around Johannesburg CBD

Thrilling, Adventurous Helicopter Experience

Climb aboard the Robinson R44 helicopter, for the thrill of your Life AT SUNSET TIME!  Experience a fairy tale of sunset, an unforgettable romantic flight over Johannesburg CBD.  Nothing else comes close to the magic of vertical flight with your romantic partner gazing into the orange skies experiencing both of best worlds.  Take your seat as the pilot climbs gracefully into the sunset skies.  Then swooping over the city , and a while later settling gently back to earth.  See the city from a new perspective, a memory of a special flight which will last a lifetime!

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